No more needles?

Posted in Dentist Cape Town / pain control



No more needles?

A newly Developed Anaesthetic Could End Dentist Fears.
A needleless anaesthetic mist has been developed and could put an end to millions of petrified patient's fears of the dentist chair. Clinical trials are expected to begin very soon on the anaesthesia that will numb the patient's mouth without the use of the much feared painful needle injection. Reports suggest that over 145 million people of in fear of the dentist and the teeth numbing needle is to blame for the huge number of fears.
The nasal mist, called Kovacaine, numbs the upper teeth but not the lips or cheeks and therefore it is claimed that the patient won't suffer from the usual numbing feeling after treatment. Dentist, Robert Harrison, said: "Some people are afraid of the needle, no doubt about it.
"If a dentist becomes skilled at giving injections, however, it’s pretty tolerable for most patients." Dentists have identified the mist as an ideal replacement for needles when treating young children as it offers a pain free experience. Dr Kenneth Allen, a dentist and supporter of the new anaesthetic, said: "I’m hoping the product is everything they claim because it would be wonderful. "I’d love it if we could replace the needle completely, but I’ve found in a majority of patients if you just take the time and compassionately deliver a slow injection, they do just fine." Although the new anaesthetic method is exciting many dental professional it is still on trial and yet to be known whether or not the needle substitute will be used worldwide. s anaesthetic mist has been developed and could put an end to millions of petrified patient's fears of the dentist chair.

Clinical trials are expected to begin very soon on the anaesthesia that will numb the patient's mouth without the use of the much feared painful needle injection. Reports suggest that over 145 million people of in fear of the dentist and the teeth numbing needle is to blame for the huge number of fears. The nasal mist, called Kovacaine, numbs the upper teeth but not the lips or cheeks and therefore it is claimed that the patient won't suffer from the usual numbing feeling after treatment. Dentist, Robert Harrison, said: "Some people are afraid of the needle, no doubt about it. "If a dentist becomes skilled at giving injections, however, it’s pretty tolerable for most patients."

Dentists have identified the mist as an ideal replacement for needles when treating young children as it offers a pain free experience. Dr Kenneth Allen, a dentist and supporter of the new anaesthetic, said: "I’m hoping the product is everything they claim because it would be wonderful. "I’d love it if we could replace the needle completely, but I’ve found in a majority of patients if you just take the time and compassionately deliver a slow injection, they do just fine." Although the new anaesthetic method is exciting many dental professional it is still on trial and yet to be known whether or not the needle substitute will be used worldwide.


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